Asthma Attack

Asthma Attack

I was serving in a primary presidency (someone in charge of the children in the congregation) at my local church. We had planned an activity for the children after school. Immediately after school the children raced the short distance from the school to the church. As the children came into the gym of the church, one girl seemed to be struggling to get a breath. I went over to her to see what was going on. I had her take a rest on a couch in the church entryway.

I asked her if she had asthma and she replied that she did. I asked her if she had her inhaler with her. She told me that she did not have an inhaler. She said that when she had episodes like this her Mom would have her rest until her body calmed down. What better way to calm down that a foot zone! I asked her if I could help by rubbing her feet. She said yes, and I picked up her foot and proceeded to work the lung and bronchial signal on her foot. As I worked the lungs, bronchi and vagus nerve, I noticed that her breathing became less labored and more clear. Within a couple minutes her breathing had gone back to normal. She hopped off the couch and excitedly ran into the gym to play with the rest of her friends. I continued to keep a close watch on her throughout the rest of the activity. Of course, she did fine. 

At the conclusion of the primary activity parents came to pick up their children. I pulled aside this girl’s mom and I let her know what happened. I learned from the mom that this little girl did have an inhaler and that she used it fairly often. I was a little surprised since the little girl insisted she never used an inhaler. Her mother explained that she probably didn’t want to come home and use her inhaler but wanted to stay and play. I explained to her what I did and expressed a hope that she was okay with me foot zoning her daughter. Her mother assured me that she was happy that it worked and that her daughter was able to stay and participate. It was fun for me to see her daughter shift from struggling to breathe to being able to jump up and run and play with her friends within a few minutes.